International Labor Organization: Persons with Disabilities in a Just Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy

The International Labour Organization has released a specific policy brief regarding the needs to consult and include persons with disabilities in climate change adaptation and mitigation, specifically regarding transitions to a new and green economy. Persons with disabilities often experience multiple negative impacts from climate change, especially when their lived experiences intersect with other disproportionately climate change-vulnerable characteristics such as gender, indigeneity, socio-economic status, and race. The brief includes a convenient overview of existing frameworks to guide action. The policy brief emphasizes the important of inclusive participation, skill-development support as economies transition, and leverage the often untapped potential of persons with disabilities in imagining and implementing green and just economies.

World Quaker Day at Hill House Meeting, Ghana

October 6th is World Quaker Day, and many Friends and their respective meetings around the world gathered around the climate-conscious theme of “Sustainability: planting seeds of renewal for the world we love”.

Hill House Meeting in Ghana started by discussing a range of questions to engage with what sustainability is and how it connects to Quaker testimonies, from which in particular arose the importance of the future, of planning ahead and considering generations to come. This is expressed in a Ghanaian proverb that says ‘dea wodua na wobu’ – meaning you reap what you sow. So if you plant good seeds (good ideas) you will have good results (expression of love and care) for the future. Other items discussed ranged from good governance to land tenure and electricity production. Ultimately this translated in Hill House Meeting committing to more environmental practices as a community and as individuals.

Friends World Committee for Consultation, which has supported the meetings celebrating World Quaker Day has further information specifically about Hill House Meeting and how Quakers around the world joined in on celebrations with a focus on sustainability.

Nothing Lowly in the Universe: an Integral Approach to the Ecological Crisis

nothinglowly

Nothing Lowly in the Universe: An Integral Approach to the Ecological Crisis explores the connections between the scientific, technological, economic, cultural, psychological and religious forces driving the crisis and shows how we can transform the ways of thinking and living that got us here. Drawing on the Quaker testimonies of integrity, reciprocity, nonviolence, simplicity, and the fundamental equality of the whole earth community, on other wisdom traditions, and on the work of visionaries from Gandhi and Arne Naess to E.F. Schumacher and Thomas Berry, Jennie M. Ratcliffe explores the spiritual principles of an integrated deep ecology, economy and peace, and shows how they are being put into practice around the world.

Jennie M. Ratcliffe is an environmental research scientist, Quaker, and activist. She lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina, and is a long-time member of Durham Friends Meeting (NC). She has worked for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the Universities of London and North Carolina, and has been active in peace, social and ecological concerns for many years in the Quaker community and beyond.

$27.00 (U.S.) ISBN: 978-1-7336600-0-6

The Crundale Press, Hillsborough NC (imprint).

Distributed by Ingram Content Group worldwide.

For further information please contact: TheCrundalePress@mindspring.com